Shepherds of Healing highlights Jake Beach for the “Always be a Shepherd” series.

Allow us to introduce Jake Beach, a Judicial Law Clerk for the U.S. District Court!

Feel free to follow Jake Beach on:

Instagram and LinkedIn


Let us tell you a little about Jake Beach.

Jake is from Grapevine, Texas, and was raised in a family where everyone works in or around veterinary medicine. Jake went to Texas A&M University for his undergraduate and then the University of Texas for law school. So, it makes him a self-loathing longhorn. In his free time, he likes to play pick-up basketball and read. He has recently picked up 2k, but his player is pretty bad so he has a rough time at the Rec. Fun fact: When Jake was younger, he would tell people that he wanted to be a "Zombie Police Officer" when he grew up. 2020 is his year!


Explain how COVID-19/ George Floyd's death has impacted you (emotionally, physically, finically, spiritually, and mentally) in a positive and negative way.

For all the negative impact COVID has caused, one positive aspect is that it slowed everyday life down..for everyone. Because of this, people are able to pay more attention to what is going on around them. If things hadn’t slowed down, would the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd have received the national attention they did? When people were forced to pay attention, we saw the response and attempts at change that occurs across the nation. On a similar note, it is encouraging to see people get more informed. Before the virus, many would draw conclusions from a headline because reading an article didn’t fit their fast-paced life. Now, more people are reading articles, listening to podcasts, and actually grappling with some heavy, but important, issues. As for negative, the isolation would really get me down at times. I think it goes to show the importance of community and that we, as humans, really do need each other.


Tell us about your company/occupation. What’s your biggest professional or personal accomplishment? Explain how you felt working towards it and how you felt when it was achieved.

I currently work for the U.S. Court System, where I help a Federal Judge with his case research and management. My biggest accomplishment was being offered this position (it is called a clerkship) because it signified that all the work invested in my legal education paid off. The clerkship also gave me an opportunity to be hands-on and really understand the Court System, which is important when you start talking about reform. When I was working towards it, I had cautious optimism. Even if you do well, a lot of stars have to align for these to work out. I tried to keep a positive attitude while acknowledging the reality it may never happen. So, it was an exciting day when it paid off.


What was your childhood like? Describe your environment from your house to your neighborhood to your school. How did these experiences shape you and your future success?

While my mother was pregnant with me, I became very sick in the womb. This ultimately required the doctors to remove my left lung as a child. This medical event had a substantial effect on my life, but not for the reasons you might have guessed. It is true that I couldn’t play sports and had to avoid certain activities that are the norm for children. This became more pronounced as I got older, which was hard because sports are one of the primary outlets for developing skills like teamwork, work ethic, and goal-setting. This was especially notable because, even though I went to a great public school, I did not fit the mold for success there because there was a hyper-focus on athletics. Instead, I had to find different ways to get involved, which led to really cool community service opportunities that set me on the path I am on today. I may have never been a JV or Varsity starter, but I now have a wealth of experiences that I would not trade for anything. This taught me two things: First, I learned that you can mold your own path. If I measured my worth by what my community valued, I would have been a failure. Instead, I followed the lead of mentors who helped me develop skills in other ways. Second, I learned the value of mentorship. If I didn’t have guidance and encouragement along the way, I probably wouldn’t have been able to see past my surroundings.


Tell us about your inner circle (close friends, family, mentors, relationship). How does their support impact your success?

I try to surround myself with “peer mentors”--people I want to be more like. We all know the value of this with older mentors, but the same goes for friends. I believe “you are who you surround yourself with.” My closest friends have traits like wisdom, congeniality, and confidence that I wish would rub off on me! My fiancee is a great example of this, too, because she is one of the most passionate people I know. Their support, direct and indirect, pushes me to grow as a person which helps with both personal and professional success.


List a few habits that a young person should start implementing to set them up for a successful future?

1. Actively seek mentors. As I mentioned above, mentors were able to invest in me as an individual, which helped me stay the course in pursuing my goals. 2. Don’t let other people define success for you or put you in a box. If you have a passion or dream, go for it. This is more of a mindset than a task, but your attitude is one of the most important habits you can develop. 3. On a more tangible level, develop organizational skills. Time is scarce, so be intentional about maximizing your time. 4. Develop a love of learning. If you think school is boring, it is just because they teach topics you aren’t interested in. Find something you are passionate about, and you will find learning about it to be something you actually want to do!


Share a big mistake you made professionally or personally. How did you fix it and what did you learn?

When I was in college, I was responsible for setting up a philanthropy event for my student organization. While we did service projects, this was our first large event. I thought I had a really good idea for what we should do, but most of the group wasn’t that interested or excited about it. I dug my feet in the ground and convinced myself they would eventually see it my way. The event wasn’t a total disaster, but it wasn’t far off from that either. Why? Because everyone responsible for actually running the event wasn’t invested in its success because they didn’t like the idea and, to make matters worse, felt like I didn’t care about their opinion. I succeeded in executing the plan but completely failed to actually lead my peers. I learned that you have to be open-minded when leading and that passion drives results. We fixed it by fielding multiple philanthropy ideas and seeking a partner organization that people would be excited about. The next year’s event was exponentially more successful for it!


What are you afraid of for boys and men in the future?

I am afraid that boys and men in the future will think that merely talking about a problem is a sufficient solution. Being vocal is important, but that is just one part of the equation. I appreciate that younger generations are identifying the parts of society that they want to be more inclusive and fair. Young men are finding their voices on social media...but they can’t stop there. They have to back up their words with action. They have to be willing to be part of the solution. I am afraid that this message is being lost in a world where retweets and likes feel like an accomplishment.


If you could give your 18 -year-old self-advice about the adult you are today, what would it be?

I am afraid that boys and men in the future will think that merely talking about a problem is a sufficient solution. Being vocal is important, but that is just one part of the equation. I appreciate that younger generations are identifying the parts of society that they want to be more inclusive and fair. Young men are finding their voices on social media...but they can’t stop there. They have to back up their words with action. They have to be willing to be part of the solution. I am afraid that this message is being lost in a world where retweets and likes feel like an accomplishment.

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